Tag Archives: write like you’re running out of time

NaNoWriMo 2018: Week One

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I fully intended to write this post on Thursday so it could be posted on Friday, telling you all about how I’d triumphed over my deadlines and gotten so many words written. unfortunately, what actually happened was me being nervous about my race on Saturday and relieved about finishing my drafts and revisions that I sort of just passed out. Then on Saturday I went straight from work to Dallas for the races, and from there I didn’t get home until about 10, at which point I promptly crashed out and slept for about twelve hours. Hey, I ran 16 miles. But we’ll talk more about that later this week.

Yesterday I picked up my computer to try and get some words in, and discovered that I didn’t like how I began the story, how I had the main character acting, and the tone in general so I trashed it. Of course, then I started to panic because I was basically back to zero.

I remedied this by writing 4,000 words yesterday, which doesn’t put me near close enough to be caught up, but it’s a good start.

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NaNoWriMo 2018: NaNostalgia

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It was cold, most likely because we lived closer to the mountains than Denver. I don’t remember if there was snow on the ground, but I do remember that we were tearing down the haunted house my clinic had put up to raise money for charity. I was tired because I’d stayed up for hours after the haunted house the night before doing the thing I loved the most. Writing.

That’s how my first NaNoWriMo started, at the stroke of midnight on November 1, 2002.

Memory is a weird thing for me. I’ll forget something I did five minutes ago but can remember the scent of the air in Louisville when I was walking through the Flatiron Crossing Christmas village to get to the theatre to watch the second Harry Potter movie again. I remember how much I loved school, I loved my clinic, I loved my husband. And at that time, I also loved NaNoWriMo.

The decision to write a 50,000 word novel in 30 days was daunting, to say the least. The majority of what I’d written was fanfiction, and lots of it. My one attempt at a novel was fun but clumsy, but I’d grown since then and figured that even if it was terrible it would be something original.

Now, 16 years later, I have done NaNo plenty of times. I’ve won more often than not and I am confident I can write a novel in a month. I’ve published 3, about to be 4, books, I’ve had novellas in box sets, and I’ve had a book signing. I attribute this directly to NaNoWriMo, because without my very first novel I wouldn’t have known I could write one.

November 2018: let’s do this.